all things bright and beautiful

October 15, 2006

facile

Filed under: definitions,Research,writing — csometimes @ 7:18 pm
Word of the Day for Sunday, October 15, 2006
facile \FAS-uhl\, adjective:

1. Easily done or performed; not difficult.
2. Arrived at without due care or effort; lacking depth; as, “too facile a solution for so complex a problem.”
3. Ready; quick; expert; as, “he is facile in expedients”; “he wields a facile pen.”

The colt supplying that evidence was Rock of Gibraltar, who recorded yet another facile victory at Group One level.
— J. A. McGrath, “Rock thriving on success”, Daily Telegraph, June 18, 2002

Today, the nuclear projects in Iran, Iraq, and North Korea forbid the facile conclusion that the atomic weapons age is conclusively ended.
— Abba Eban, Diplomacy for the Next Century

This is a very facile sort of speculation not supported by the facts or by common sense.
— Roberto González Echevarría, The Pride of Havana

Some years before he had earned small sums scribbling paragraphs for the front page of the Civil and Military Gazette, whilst admitting to his sister Jane that a dissertation on the uselessness of the Viceroy came readily to his facile pen.
— Frances Spalding, Duncan Grant: A Biography

He had a fluent, facile style with the brush, but (much more significantly for Yeats) he painted the visions which rose up before him like emanations from some alternative reality.
— Terence Brown, The Life of W. B. Yeats

concinnity

Filed under: definitions,writing — csometimes @ 4:20 am
Word of the Day for Thursday, October 12, 2006
concinnity \kuhn-SIN-uh-tee\, noun:

1. Internal harmony or fitness in the adaptation of parts to a whole or to each other.
2. Studied elegance of design or arrangement — used chiefly of literary style.
3. An instance of concinnity.

He has what one character calls “the gifts of concinnity and concision,” that deft swipe with a phrase that can be so devastating in children.
— Elizabeth Ward

Denis Donoghue is a primary critic of our time, catholic in scope, unique in literary apprehension, crucially gratifying in the clear concinnity of his prose.
— Ihab Hassan

Even so, rules are not merely there to be ignored; in fact, they constitute a democratic aristocracy based not on Debrett’s Peerage or the Almanach de Gotha but on the user’s respect for comprehensibility, consistency, concision and concinnity — or, simply, elegance.
— John Simon, “House Rules”, New York Times, October 31, 1999

October 12, 2006

hypnagogic

Filed under: Curiosity,definitions,Research,writing — csometimes @ 4:18 pm
Word of the Day for Wednesday, October 11, 2006
hypnagogic \hip-nuh-GOJ-ik; -GOH-jik\, adjective:
Of, pertaining to, or occurring in the state of drowsiness preceding sleep.

It is of course precisely in such episodes of mental traveling that writers are known to do good work, sometimes even their best, solving formal problems, getting advice from Beyond, having hypnagogic adventures that with luck can be recovered later on.New York Times, June 6, 1993

\n. . .the phenomenon of hypnagogic hallucinations, or what Mr. Alvarez describes as "the flickering images and voices that well up just before sleep takes over."
— Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, "The Faces of Night, Many of Them Scary", New York Times, January 9, 1995

\nHis uncensored and uncensoring subconscious allows him to absorb the world around him and in him, and to spit it out almost undigested, as if he were walking around in a constant hypnagogic state.
— Susan Bolotin, "Don\’t Turn Your Back on This Book", New York Times, June 9, 1985

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\nHypnagogic (sometimes spelled hypnogogic) ultimately derives from Greek hupnos, "sleep" + agogos, "leading," from agein, "to lead."

\nDictionary.com Entry and Pronunciation for hypnagogic

\n

“,1] ); //–>
— Thomas Pynchon, “Nearer, My Couch, to Thee”,
New York Times, June 6, 1993

. . .the phenomenon of hypnagogic hallucinations, or what Mr. Alvarez describes as “the flickering images and voices that well up just before sleep takes over.”
— Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, “The Faces of Night, Many of Them Scary”, New York Times, January 9, 1995

His uncensored and uncensoring subconscious allows him to absorb the world around him and in him, and to spit it out almost undigested, as if he were walking around in a constant hypnagogic state.
— Susan Bolotin, “Don’t Turn Your Back on This Book”, New York Times, June 9, 1985

October 8, 2006

confounded

Filed under: Curiosity,definitions,deprivation,privation — csometimes @ 3:23 am

i’m always confounded when i come across 2 words with similar spellings that mean the same thing…

4 results for: privation

View results from: Dictionary | Thesaurus | Encyclopedia | the Web

Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.0.1)Cite This Source

pri‧va‧tion[prahy-vey-shuhn] Pronunciation KeyShow IPA Pronunciation

–noun

1. lack of the usual comforts or necessaries of life: His life of privation began to affect his health.
2. an instance of this.
3. the act of depriving.
4. the state of being deprived.

 


[Origin: 1350–1400; ME (< MF privacion) < L prīvātiōn- (s. of prīvātiō) a taking away. See private, -ion]

1. deprivation, want, need, distress. See hardship.

Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.0.1)
Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2006.

American Heritage DictionaryCite This Source

pri·va·tion (pr-vshn) Pronunciation Key [P]
n.

    1. Lack of the basic necessities or comforts of life.
    2. The condition resulting from such lack.
  1. An act, condition, or result of deprivation or loss.

[Middle English privacion, from Old French privation, from Latin prvti, prvtin-, from prvtus, past participle of prvre, to deprive. See private.]

(Download Now or Buy the Book)

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Dictionary.com Word of the Day ArchiveCite This Source privation

privation was Word of the Day on September 13, 2001.

Dictionary.com Word of the Day

6 results for: deprivation

View results from: Dictionary | Thesaurus | Encyclopedia | the Web

Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.0.1)Cite This Source

dep‧ri‧va‧tion[dep-ruhvey-shuhn] Pronunciation KeyShow IPA Pronunciation

–noun

1. the act of depriving.
2. the fact of being deprived.
3. dispossession; loss.
4. removal from ecclesiastical office.
5. privation.

 


[Origin: 1525–35; < ML dēprīvātiōn- (s. of dēprīvātiō), equiv. to dēprīvāt(us) deprived (ptp. of dēprīvāre; see deprive, -ate1) + -iōn- -ion]

Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.0.1)
Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2006.

American Heritage DictionaryCite This Source

dep·ri·va·tion (dpr-vshn) Pronunciation Key [P]
n.

    1. The act or an instance of depriving; loss.
    2. The condition of being deprived; privation.
  1. A removal of rank or office.

(Download Now or Buy the Book)

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

American Heritage Stedman’s Medical DictionaryCite This Source dep·ri·va·tion (dpr-vshn)
n.

The absence, loss, or withholding of something needed.

The American Heritage® Stedman’s Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Merriam-Webster’s Medical DictionaryCite This Source Main Entry: de·pri·va·tion
Pronunciation: "dep-r&-'vA-sh&n, "dE-"prI-
Function: noun
: the act or process of removing or the condition resulting from removal of something normally present and usually essential for mental or physical well-being <the consequences of emotional deprivation in childhood —L. I. Gardner> <scurvy is caused by vitamin C deprivation> <sensory deprivation>

Merriam-Webster’s Medical Dictionary, © 2002 Merriam-Webster, Inc.

WordNetCite This Source deprivation

n 1: a state of extreme poverty [syn: privation, want] 2: the disadvantage that results from losing something; “his loss of credibility led to his resignation”; “losing him is no great deprivation” [syn: loss] 3: act of depriving someone of food or money or rights; “nutritional privation”; “deprivation of civil rights” [syn: privation]

WordNet ® 2.0, © 2003 Princeton University

On-line Medical DictionaryCite This Source deprivation

deprivation: in CancerWEB’s On-line Medical Dictionary

On-line Medical Dictionary, © 1997-98 Academic Medical Publishing & CancerWEB

October 7, 2006

gambol- word of the day

Filed under: definitions,Research,Revelry & frolic,Writers — csometimes @ 6:24 pm
Word of the Day for Saturday, October 7, 2006
gambol \GAM-buhl\, intransitive verb:

1. To dance and skip about in play; to frolic.
2. A skipping or leaping about in frolic.

I’ve been told dolphins like to gambol in the waves in these waters, and that sighting them brings good luck.
— Barbara Kingsolver, “Where the Map Stopped”, New York Times, May 17, 1992

The bad news is that while most of us gambol in the sun, there will be much wringing of hands in environment-hugging circles about global warming and climate change.
— Derek Brown, “Heatwaves”, The Guardian, June 16, 2000

Then they joined hands (it was the stranger who began it by catching Martha and Matilda) and danced the table round, shaking their feet and tossing their arms, the glee ever more uproarious, — danced until they were breathless, every one of them, save little Sammy, who was not asked to join the gambol, but sat still in his chair, and seemed to expect no invitation.
— Norman Duncan, “Santa Claus At Lonely Cove”, The Atlantic, December 1903


Gambol, earlier gambolde or gambalde, comes from Medieval French gambade, “a leaping or skipping,” from Late Latin gamba, “hock (of a horse), leg,” from Greek kampe, “a joint or bend.”

Dictionary.com Entry and Pronunciation for gambol

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September 28, 2006

to know me is to love me

Filed under: Uncategorized — csometimes @ 2:06 pm

i haven’t decided exactly what i’m going to do with this blog yet, as i am too tired to think. except shamelessly promote my other blogs, which i will do after i’ve gotten some sleep. basically i’m here to see if i like this better than google.

here are a list of blogs that i’m working on now…

http://quotesandwisdom.blogspot.com/

http://blogsofinterest.blogspot.com/

http://freeversemadness.blogspot.com/

http://mentalhelp-csometimes.blogspot.com/

http://cs-photojournal.blogspot.com/

Blog at WordPress.com.